Spares, Repairs and Service  

spares composite pic
Spares manuals and service items

 

 

Spares


Although well built and reliable as the bikes from the Plumstead Road factory undoubtedly were, there would still come a time for every owner to use the facilities provided by the Spares and Service Departments of AMC.


For those who lived local to Woolwich, this would have meant a visit to the buildings that were situated on the opposite side of Burrage Grove to the factory, behind whose counters the experienced staff would (hopefully) be able to locate and supply the parts needed to get your motorcycle back into running condition.


The far end of the building, adjacent to the Race Shop, housed the Spares Department with public access to it via double doors at the top of the long stone steps. The near end was occupied by the Service and Repair Department.

Spares and Service Building
Spares and Service building
(extracted from Motor Cycling front cover of 28 Oct 1954)

Others who lived further afield, or overseas, would be able to make use of the vast dealership network that had been built up over the years to obtain original manufactured spare parts that could be relied on as exact replacements for their bikes.


Coordinating this constant flow of parts from the factory's production departments to the many spares stockists was a daunting task that required close cooperation between the Spares Department and the progress controllers in the factory, whose other priority was to ensure that the production lines were keep supplied with parts for the new builds. In times of high demand for new machines, this was quite a balancing act.



Spares and Service building pic
Spares and Service building
(from roof of main factory)

It's worth remembering that all this coordination work between the dealers, the spares department and the factory took place in a pre-computer age.

All the operations inevitably involved paperwork, in the form of order requisitions, invoices receipts, etc., the recording of which would have been done on various card indexing systems that needed to be efficiently maintained to avoid problems.


The majority of staff employed in both the Spares and Service Departments would have been long serving employees whose experience and contacts were vital to make it run smoothly. It was a day-to-day challenge in trying to locate and despatch selected parts from the thousands of possibilities to all parts of the world.


In the picture (right) of the Spares and Service building, bikes can be seen outside the service department just behind the car parked on the pavement.
The site for the firm's intended further expansion can be seen beyond the service building.


Service and Repair


No matter how carefully you ride a motorcycle and how diligently your maintenance of the machine, unless you are very fortunate, there will eventually come a time when serious service or repair work becomes necessary.
For anything that was beyond the capability of the owner, the Service Department could be relied on to come to the rescue.


Mick Duffy in repair shop pic
Mick Duffy working on a Matchless machine
Bike on repair shop hoist pic
Bike on repair shop hoist
This service team was backed by the Repair Shop where anything, up to and including a complete machine rebuild could be completed.
With convenient access to the comprehensive stock of spare parts in the adjacent department and staffed by an experienced team who were familiar with every model of bike, past and present, that the Company had produced, there was little repair work that couldn't be undertaken.



Being a motor cycle enthusiast yourself was also a bonus in dealing with customers, as was the case with the appointment of both ex-ISDT rider Hugh Viney and later Fred Neill to manage the Service Department.

Hugh Viney pic
Hugh Viney - Service Manager
(in previous ISDT mode)

(During the peak of his trials days, Hugh once practiced his technique by repeatedly climbing and descending one of the stone staircases from ground floor to the roof on his bike, until he could do a run without having to put a foot down).


Fred Neill was a long term employee and former tester whose encyclopaedic knowledge enabled him to compile the invaluable instruction books.
He was also the author of the much respected 'Practical Guide' books about the various model ranges of AMC motorcycles.



John Hudson was another uniquely dedicated employee who had moved down from Bracebridge Street when Norton production was relocated to Plumstead.

He was not only conversant with just about every component used on Norton machines but would to anything to solve a customer's problem. This would often involve riding hundreds of miles in all weathers at great personal discomfort and sacrifice to carry out a replacement or repair at the customer's home.


John was also unbelievably helpful to the AMC drawing office staff who had the task of assimilating many of the Norton parts the AMC system and into the various Matchless-framed/Norton-engined hybrid machines that were subsequently developed.



Spares Personnel
Pearl CarmenSecretary
Jack CheckleyManager
Bob Day
Jeanette FarleyTypist
Emily LeonardOffice Clerk
Fred NormanSales
Mike Wicks
Bill WrightSales
Violet HuckfieldSupervisor (invoicing)


Service Personnel
Ken Chale
Herbert CoomberAssistant manager
Reg Curley
John HudsonAssistant Manager (ex. Norton)
Arthur Lewthwaite
Jim (Mouldy) Molesworth Edwards
Fred NeillManager
Ray OliverEngines (assistant to John Hudson)
John Robarts1959 - 66Assistant Manager (AJS/M)
Sid Thompson
Hugh VineyManager
Cyril Vernon (Vern) Wallis1950 - 53show stand
Graham Weeks
Derek Wickes
Elsie WoodleySecretary to Fred Neill


Repair Shop Personnel
Kenny Chater
Alf CurleyForks
Mick Duffy
Gerry HartnellLater Drawing Office clerk
Ray Learton
Ernie ThomasForks & suspension
Frank Topps
Mike WicksLater Engine Shop